Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Feds want five-year paper trail for livestock NAIS COOL

Feds want five-year paper trail for livestock



By Megan R. Wilson - 05/06/13 01:59 PM ET



The Obama administration has adopted stricter record keeping rules for the livestock industry in hopes of aiding officials who trace animal-borne diseases.


First proposed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) under the George W. Bush administration, the regulations require livestock producers, slaughterhouses and rendering plants to keep five years of records for animals that have been in their facilities.


The previous rules only required two years of recordkeeping and excluded the slaughtering and rendering industries.


The inspection service wants access to documents such as “weight tickets, sales slips, and records of origin, identification, and destination that relate to livestock that are in, or that have been in, the facility,” according to a Federal Register publication scheduled to print on Tuesday.


The proposal, released in 2008, received little feedback from the public or the industry.


One comment complained that slaughterhouses and rendering plants are already subject to record keeping requirements under the Food and Drug Administration, but the inspection service countered that those records only need to be kept for one year.


Some diseases, such as bovine tuberculosis, can stay dormant for months or years, the agency says.


It wants to be able to go through records and track the source of an illness long after an animal dies.


Since poultry and pigs have a shorter lifespan than other livestock, APHIS agreed to only require a two-year retention of documents for those animals.


The regulations will become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register.










it’s about damn time !



I wonder if this includes cervids as well ? according to the shooting pen owners and USDA et al, cervids is their livestock now $$$






Wednesday, April 24, 2013


Dissociation between Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) Infectivity and Proteinase K-Resistant PrPSc Levels in Peripheral Tissue from a Murine Transgenic Model of TSE Disease







Saturday, December 15, 2012


Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: the effect of oral exposure dose on attack rate and incubation period in cattle -- an update 5 December 2012







Friday, April 19, 2013


FDA BSE TSE PRION NEWS FEED AND ANNUAL INSPECTION OF FEED MILLS REPORTS HAS CEASED TO EXIST







Monday, March 25, 2013


Minnesota Firm Recalls Bone-In Ribeye That May Contain Specified Risk Materials Recall Release CLASS II RECALL FSIS-RC-024-2013







Tuesday, March 5, 2013


Use of Materials Derived From Cattle in Human Food and Cosmetics; Reopening of the Comment Period FDA-2004-N-0188-0051 (TSS SUBMISSION)


FDA believes current regulation protects the public from BSE but reopens comment period due to new studies







Wednesday, March 20, 2013


GAO-13-244, Mar 18, 2013 Dietary Supplements FDA May Have Opportunities to Expand Its Use of Reported Health Problems to Oversee Product


From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.


Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 2:46 PM


To: gomezj@gao.gov


Cc: siggerudk@gao.gov ; youngc1@gao.gov ; oighotline@gao.gov







Wednesday, February 20, 2013


World Organization for Animal Health Recommends United States' BSE Risk Status Be Upgraded


Statement from Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack:







Thursday, February 14, 2013


The Many Faces of Mad Cow Disease Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy BSE and TSE prion disease







Friday, April 19, 2013


Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Feed Safety Support Program Grants Fiscal Year 2011: October 1, 2010 - September 30, 2011 FDA







Friday, April 19, 2013


APHIS 2013 Stakeholder Meeting (March 2013) BSE TSE PRION







Tuesday, April 30, 2013


Mad cow infected blood 'to kill 1,000’







Wednesday, April 24, 2013


Chimpanzees Released After 30 Years Of Testing, Brace Yourself For Smiles








Tuesday, April 30, 2013


Foodborne Transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Nonhuman Primates








Monday, May 6, 2013


BSE-associated Prion-Amyloid Cardiomyopathy in Primates


Volume 19, Number 6—June 2013








Tuesday, December 15, 2009


NAIS, COOL, FROM FARM TO FORK, MAD COW DISEASE


Greetings,


I do not understand the logic behind the fear to NAIS and COOL ?


I really don't.


Everything about us is traceable by the Government. Birth certificate, driver's license, social security number, your deed to your house, property, house number, car title, all the parts of your car are traceable, even each owner of the car since it rolled off the assembly line, boat, motor, etc. etc.


SO why all the concern on traceability of the food we eat ?


WHY does most folks in the industry fear this so much $$$


The fear of the NAIS and or COOL seems to be that no one wants their product to be traceable, because of fear of litigation from contaminated food, rather than the excuse of not wanting the Government messing in your business. Just my opinion.


An example would be the California mad cow beef recall (see history below), that eventually humans were exposed to suspect mad cow beef. A lot of folks. Same as with the Dead Stock Downer Cow School Lunch Program. These kids all across our Nation, for four years and probably longer, were fed the most high risk cattle for BSE aka mad cow disease from dead stock downer cows, where the largest beef recall (at the time) took place, of which, a great deal were already consumed by our children. With an incubation period of 50+ years in some cases, in others much shorter, who will watch our children for CJD for the next 5+ decades ?



snip...see full text ;








Friday, August 20, 2010 USDA: Animal Disease Traceability August 2010 USDA: Animal Disease Traceability August 2010




Greetings,


as a consumer, my opinion (if that matters), you need some sort of traceability for your livestock. I don't want to know anything about your family, your income, your kids, your sex life, nothing but to be able to trace that animal from farm to fork. I want to know whether or not if that animal has been fed animal protein, antibiotics, and if myself or my family do get sick, we should be able to trace that product. I don't see the problem. you can trace every part on your car, I can find out anything I want about you on the internet. why can't I do that with a cow?


let's review a few things about the NAIS, why we need it past and present. let's review first the few mad cows that were accidently found, birth cohorts, herd cohorts etc., and how efficient or NOT the traceability of those 4 animals were....oops, that's right, the first stumbling and staggering mad cow in Texas was sent straight to the render, did not pass GO(inspection), did not get $200.(prion rapid test), and of course, was never confirmed. THEN the second mad cow, the one that would never have been confirmed if not for an act of Congress and the Honorable Fong of the OIG, and scientist from the EU and the USA asking questions, meanwhile the BSE MRR was being finalized. Then after 7 months of sitting on the shelf, after a secret test had already turned up positive, but yet still 7 months no confirmation on a BSE positive test that by the BSE Red Books, it should have been a 48 hour turnaround on that test. Finally, the 2nd Texas mad cow was confirmed positive BSE. later termed atypical h-BSE. Then you had the Alabama mad cow, now termed g-h-BSEalabama, and then of course the mad cow old Luther capped in Washington state, the white one, that changed colors, and then was said to be a Canadian traitor c-BSE mad cow. IT's all Canada's fault ;-(NOT)


Be sure to see the latest data on the typical and atypical cases of BSE and Scrapie and any human CJD TSE there from. This is down toward the bottom of the posting.


BSE, USDA, NAIS, AND TRACEABILITY


Let's look at how the USDA et al trace BSE aka mad cow cases, birth, and index herd cattle in the past (or rather how they could not trace them).


TEXAS MAD COW (h-BSE), that was finally tested and documented 7+ months after an act of Congress, and Scientist from all over the Globe questioning the testing methods and negative findings of this Texas mad cow. ...


TEXAS h-BSE MAD COW CASE THAT WAS FINALLY DOCUMENTED



snip...see full text ;









February 10, 2010


Greetings,


IN my opinion, i think we need NAIS. i think as a consumer, we have a right to this information. as a Country importing our product, they have a right to know, it should be law. it should be mandatory that when an animal disease or human disease there from break out, the animal and or it's product can be traced. and as a producer of that product, if you are too worried about confidentiality, you are trying to hide something, then you should not be in the business. how in the world can knowing from where a cow comes from i.e. traceability, be such a threat to the producer, unless they simply want to hide something? in 2010, the USA, in relations to cattle identification and tracing, could not trace their @ss if they had both hands on it, in my opinion, and going by past history of the last two documented mad cows. the USA has been discussing this for over a decade. I don't understand it, all these other Country's that have some sort of Animal Traceability in place, they are and have been trying to eradicate BSE, that have had a feed ban in place, that have been abiding by it, testing in numbers to find and eradicate the TSEs, and the USA just seems to be doing the opposite in many ways it seems to me. if the USA is not going to trace it's meat products, why should other Country's trace theirs? The USA is BSE GBR III, all of North America is BSE GBR III (with all the evidence of breaches in the bse feed ban, the breaches in the BSE surveillance program, i personally believe it is BSE GBR IV). The problem is, the USDA just never accepted it (BSE GBR III), and then changed the rules with the BSE MRR. this BSE MRR policy literally trashed 30 years of attempted BSE GBR eradication of this disease. What about other trading partners with the U.S.A. that DO HAVE a traceability system. i think Australia is getting ready to roll over and get MRR'ed, therefore they too will just be another victim of allowing all strains of Typical and Atypical BSE/TSE into their Country via the USDA OIE BSE MRR policy, a policy of trading all strains of mad cow disease globally. The O.I.E., by bending over for the USDA with this damn BSE MRR policy, has sold their sole to the devil, and in doing so, sold yours too. ...


remember, and do not forget what the Honorable Nobel Peace Prize winner of the PRION i.e. Stanley Prusiner said ;


THEY DON'T WANT TO KNOW ! ABSOLUTE IGNORANCE, ALL THAT MATTERS IS TRADE...


AFTER THE COW IN CANADA...LEVEL OF ABSOLUTE IGNORANCE, OF WHAT HE WAS TRYTING TO CONTAIN...


THE ENTIRE POLICY WAS DRIVEN BY WHAT THE USA WAS TELLING HIM TO DO...SO NOW AFTER SOME TIME HAS PASSED...


SO NOW AFTER TIME HAS PASSED IT'S O.K. FOR BONELESS BEEF PRODUCTS FROM UNDER 30 MONTHS TO BE EXPORTED FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES, THAT'S ALL THAT MATTERED...


YES, I THINK THAT PRIONS ARE BAD TO EAT, AND YOU CAN DIE FROM THEM...



snip...see full text ;













Friday, December 21, 2012


USDA Issues Final Rule for Animal Disease Traceability




















Friday, March 13, 2009


NAIS comments NCBA and R-Calf Wednesday, March 11, 2009 – 10:30 a.m. Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry — Public Hearing







Saturday, August 16, 2008


Qualitative Analysis of BSE Risk Factors in the United States February 13, 2000 at 3:37 pm PST (BSE red book)







48 hour traceback for BSE mad cow disease in the USA ???


NOT in your lifetime !


8 YEARS IN REVIEW OF THE MAD COW DEBACLE IN THE USA ;










Tuesday, April 16, 2013


Cervid Industry Unites To Set Direction for CWD Reform and seem to ignore their ignorance and denial in their role in spreading Chronic Wasting Disease








Thursday, May 02, 2013


Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Texas Important Update on OBEX ONLY TEXTING















Thursday, February 21, 2013


National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center Cases Examined January 16, 2013








16 YEAR OLD SPORADIC FFI ?





Monday, January 14, 2013


Gambetti et al USA Prion Unit change another highly suspect USA mad cow victim to another fake name i.e. sporadic FFI at age 16 CJD Foundation goes along with this BSe








Monday, December 31, 2012


Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease and Human TSE Prion Disease in Washington State, 2006–2011-2012







Tuesday, December 25, 2012


CREUTZFELDT JAKOB TSE PRION DISEASE HUMANS END OF YEAR REVIEW DECEMBER 25, 2012








Tuesday, June 26, 2012


Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease Human TSE report update North America, Canada, Mexico, and USDA PRION UNIT as of May 18, 2012


type determination pending Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (tdpCJD), is on the rise in Canada and the USA








Wednesday, June 13, 2012


MEXICO IS UNDER or MIS DIAGNOSING CREUTZFELDT JAKOB DISEASE AND OTHER PRION DISEASE SOME WITH POSSIBLE nvCJD








*** The discovery of previously unrecognized prion diseases in both humans and animals (i.e., Nor98 in small ruminants) demonstrates that the range of prion diseases might be wider than expected and raises crucial questions about the epidemiology and strain properties of these new forms. We are investigating this latter issue by molecular and biological comparison of VPSPr, GSS and Nor98.





VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE ...price of prion poker goes up again $


OR-10: Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy is transmissible in bank voles


Romolo Nonno,1 Michele Di Bari,1 Laura Pirisinu,1 Claudia D’Agostino,1 Stefano Marcon,1 Geraldina Riccardi,1 Gabriele Vaccari,1 Piero Parchi,2 Wenquan Zou,3 Pierluigi Gambetti,3 Umberto Agrimi1 1Istituto Superiore di Sanit√†; Rome, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche, Universit√† di Bologna; Bologna, Italy; 3Case Western Reserve University; Cleveland, OH USA


Background. Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy (VPSPr) is a recently described “sporadic”neurodegenerative disease involving prion protein aggregation, which has clinical similarities with non-Alzheimer dementias, such as fronto-temporal dementia. Currently, 30 cases of VPSPr have been reported in Europe and USA, of which 19 cases were homozygous for valine at codon 129 of the prion protein (VV), 8 were MV and 3 were MM. A distinctive feature of VPSPr is the electrophoretic pattern of PrPSc after digestion with proteinase K (PK). After PK-treatment, PrP from VPSPr forms a ladder-like electrophoretic pattern similar to that described in GSS cases. The clinical and pathological features of VPSPr raised the question of the correct classification of VPSPr among prion diseases or other forms of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we report preliminary data on the transmissibility and pathological features of VPSPr cases in bank voles.


Materials and Methods. Seven VPSPr cases were inoculated in two genetic lines of bank voles, carrying either methionine or isoleucine at codon 109 of the prion protein (named BvM109 and BvI109, respectively). Among the VPSPr cases selected, 2 were VV at PrP codon 129, 3 were MV and 2 were MM. Clinical diagnosis in voles was confirmed by brain pathological assessment and western blot for PK-resistant PrPSc (PrPres) with mAbs SAF32, SAF84, 12B2 and 9A2.


Results. To date, 2 VPSPr cases (1 MV and 1 MM) gave positive transmission in BvM109. Overall, 3 voles were positive with survival time between 290 and 588 d post inoculation (d.p.i.). All positive voles accumulated PrPres in the form of the typical PrP27–30, which was indistinguishable to that previously observed in BvM109 inoculated with sCJDMM1 cases.


In BvI109, 3 VPSPr cases (2 VV and 1 MM) showed positive transmission until now. Overall, 5 voles were positive with survival time between 281 and 596 d.p.i.. In contrast to what observed in BvM109, all BvI109 showed a GSS-like PrPSc electrophoretic pattern, characterized by low molecular weight PrPres. These PrPres fragments were positive with mAb 9A2 and 12B2, while being negative with SAF32 and SAF84, suggesting that they are cleaved at both the C-terminus and the N-terminus. Second passages are in progress from these first successful transmissions.


Conclusions. Preliminary results from transmission studies in bank voles strongly support the notion that VPSPr is a transmissible prion disease. Interestingly, VPSPr undergoes divergent evolution in the two genetic lines of voles, with sCJD-like features in BvM109 and GSS-like properties in BvI109.


The discovery of previously unrecognized prion diseases in both humans and animals (i.e., Nor98 in small ruminants) demonstrates that the range of prion diseases might be wider than expected and raises crucial questions about the epidemiology and strain properties of these new forms. We are investigating this latter issue by molecular and biological comparison of VPSPr, GSS and Nor98.










Wednesday, March 28, 2012


VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE, price of prion poker goes up again $







Sunday, March 31, 2013


Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease CJD worlds youngest documented victim, 11 years old, shall we pray








Monday, April 15, 2013


Dr. Stephen B. Thacker Director Centers for Disease Control and Prevention′s Office of Science, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services (OSELS) dies from Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease CJD








IT is of my opinion, that the OIE and the USDA et al, are the soul reason, and responsible parties, for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy TSE prion diseases, including typical and atypical BSE, typical and atypical Scrapie, and all strains of CWD, and human TSE there from, spreading around the globe.


I have lost all confidence of this organization as a regulatory authority on animal disease, and consider it nothing more than a National Trading Brokerage for all strains of animal TSE, just to satisfy there commodity. AS i said before, OIE should hang up there jock strap now, since it appears they will buckle every time a country makes some political hay about trade protocol, commodities and futures. IF they are not going to be science based, they should do everyone a favor and dissolve there organization.


JUST because of low documented human body count with nvCJD and the long incubation periods, the lack of sound science being replaced by political and corporate science in relations with the fact that science has now linked some sporadic CJD with atypical BSE and atypical scrapie, and the very real threat of CWD being zoonosis, I believed the O.I.E. has failed terribly and again, I call for this organization to be dissolved. ...




A_Annex_VII_A_AHG_Report_Meeting_Final


Scrapie – The disease does not show significant morbidity (2-30% within-flock morbidity) or mortality and is not zoonotic. However, the Group noted the difficulty in evaluating the level of morbidity for diseases with a long incubation period such as scrapie. The Group recommended that the disease be delisted.








Chapter 1.6.


PROCEDURES FOR SELF DECLARATION AND FOR OFFICIAL RECOGNITION BY the OIE


Article 1.6.1.


[No change]


Article 1.6.2.


[No change]


Article 1.6.3.


Questionnaire on bovine spongiform encephalopathy


SNIP...


Article 11.5.29.


Conclusions of the risk assessment


The overall risk of BSE in the cattle population of a country or zone is proportional to the level of known or potential exposure to BSE infectivity and the potential for recycling and amplification of the infectivity through livestock feeding practices. For the risk assessment to conclude that the cattle population of a country or zone is free from BSE risk, it should have demonstrated that appropriate measures have been taken to manage any risks identified.












BOUGHT AND PAID FOR BY YOUR LOCAL CATTLE DEALERS AND LOBBYIST EVERYWHERE...



IN A NUT SHELL ;


(Adopted by the International Committee of the OIE on 23 May 2006)


11. Information published by the OIE is derived from appropriate declarations made by the official Veterinary Services of Member Countries. The OIE is not responsible for inaccurate publication of country disease status based on inaccurate information or changes in epidemiological status or other significant events that were not promptly reported to the Central Bureau,










Tuesday, July 17, 2012


O.I.E. BSE, CWD, SCRAPIE, TSE PRION DISEASE Final Report of the 80th General Session, 20 - 25 May 2012









Wednesday, May 25, 2011


O.I.E. Terrestrial Animal Health Standards Commission and prion (TSE) disease reporting 2011




----- Original Message -----


From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.


To: BSE-L@LISTS.AEGEE.ORG


Cc: trade@oie.int ; oie@oie.int ; f.diaz@oie.int ; scientific.dept@oie.int ; cjdvoice@yahoogroups.com ; BLOODCJD@YAHOOGROUPS.COM


Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 2:24 PM


Subject: O.I.E. Terrestrial Animal Health Standards Commission and prion (TSE) disease reporting 2011








Saturday, December 18, 2010


OIE Global Conference on Wildlife Animal Health and Biodiversity - Preparing for the Future (TSE AND PRIONS) Paris (France), 23-25 February 2011








Monday, November 23, 2009


BSE GBR RISK ASSESSMENTS UPDATE NOVEMBER 23, 2009 COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES AND O.I.E. COMMISSION DECISION of 11 November 2009 amending the Annex to Decision 2007/453/EC as regards the BSE status of Chile, Colombia and Japan (notified under document C(2009) 8590)









Tuesday, January 1, 2008


BSE OIE USDA


Subject: OIE BSE RECOMMENDATION FOR USA, bought and paid for by your local cattle dealers i.e. USDA


Date: May 14, 2007 at 9:00 am PST


OIE BSE RECOMMENDATION FOR USA, bought and paid for by your local cattle dealers i.e. USDA


STATEMENT BY DR. RON DEHAVEN REGARDING OIE RISK RECOMMENDATION


March 9, 2007








Tuesday, November 02, 2010


IN CONFIDENCE


The information contained herein should not be disseminated further except on the basis of "NEED TO KNOW".


BSE - ATYPICAL LESION DISTRIBUTION (RBSE 92-21367) statutory (obex only) diagnostic criteria CVL 1992








Thursday, May 02, 2013


Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Texas Important Update on OBEX ONLY TEXTING









2009 UPDATE ON ALABAMA AND TEXAS MAD COWS 2005 and 2006









Comments on technical aspects of the risk assessment were then submitted to FSIS.



Comments were received from Food and Water Watch, Food Animal Concerns Trust (FACT), Farm Sanctuary, R-CALF USA, Linda A Detwiler, and Terry S. Singeltary.


This document provides itemized replies to the public comments received on the 2005 updated Harvard BSE risk assessment. Please bear the following points in mind:








Owens, Julie


From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. [flounder9@verizon.net]


Sent: Monday, July 24, 2006 1:09 PM


To: FSIS RegulationsComments


Subject: [Docket No. FSIS-2006-0011] FSIS Harvard Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)


Page 1 of 98








FSIS, USDA, REPLY TO SINGELTARY










U.S.A. 50 STATE BSE MAD COW CONFERENCE CALL Jan. 9, 2001


















































Friday, April 19, 2013



APHIS 2013 Stakeholder Meeting (March 2013) BSE TSE PRION










National Scrapie Eradication Program for March 2013






The monthly report for the National Scrapie Eradication Program for March 2013 has been released. The monthly reports are now available in both PowerPoint and PDF formats.


(PowerPoint version)





(PDF version)








Highlights of the March 2013 Report




At the end of FY 2012, the percent of cull sheep found positive at slaughter and adjusted for face color was 0.006 percent. This measure of prevalence has decreased by 96 percent since slaughter surveillance started in FY 2003. As of March 31, 2013 this measure of prevalence is 0.006 percent.




Additionally, in FY 2012, 8 new infected or source flocks in seven states were identified. This represented a 47 percent reduction in the number of new infected and source flocks identified as compared to FY 2011. To date, two source flocks and one infected flock have been designated for FY 2013 as of March 31. snip... Does not include Nor98-like scrapie cases found through RSSS (2 in FY 2007, 1 in FY 2008, 4 in FY 2010, 1 in FY 2011).







Tuesday, April 30, 2013


Transmission of classical scrapie via goat milk


Veterinary Record2013;172:455 doi:10.1136/vr.f2613




















TSS

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