Wednesday, February 10, 2010

NAIS MAD COW TRACEABILITY DUMPED BY USDA APHIS 2010

NAIS MAD COW TRACEABILITY DUMPED BY USDA APHIS

On February 5, 2010, USDA announced a new, flexible framework for animal disease traceability in the United States.

The framework will provide the basic tenets of an improved animal disease traceability capability in the United States. USDA’s efforts will:

•Only apply to animals moved in interstate commerce; •Be administered by the States and Tribal Nations to provide more flexibility; •Encourage the use of lower-cost technology; and •Be implemented transparently through federal regulations and the full rulemaking process. USDA is committed to working in partnership with States, Tribal Nations and industry in the coming months to address many of the details of this framework, and is establishing a Secretary's Advisory Committee on Animal Health to address specific issues, such as confidentiality and liability.

For more information about the new framework, please read the following documents:

•USDA Announces New Framework for Animal Disease Traceability(En EspaƱol)

•Questions and Answers: New Animal Disease Traceability Framework

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/traceability/


Bloomberg

February 05, 2010, 02:26 PM EST

U.S. Cuts Animal-Tracking Plan Created After Mad Cow (Update3)

(Adds export figures, mad cow disease-related losses, and European Union tracking system starting in seventh paragraph.)

By Daniel Enoch and Whitney McFerron

Feb. 5 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. is scrapping a national system to track livestock from birth to slaughter as industry opposition led to the failure of a voluntary program created after cases of mad cow disease emerged starting in 2003.

snip...see full text ;

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-02-05/usda-to-limit-animal-id-plan-to-interstate-moves-update1-.html


USDA announces plans to revise animal ID system Issue Date: February 10, 2010

By Ching Lee Assistant Editor

Responding to criticism from what it called a "vast majority" of ranchers who spoke out at public forums, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced last week it is revising its policy on the National Animal Identification System in favor of a more "flexible, coordinated approach" to animal disease traceability.

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said the new policy allows states to administer their own trace-back program that focuses only on animals that move across state lines.

Rather than mandating a national, one-size-fits-all system for all producers, the USDA would work with states to adopt specific methods that work best for their local needs, he added.

The changes come after a series of public meetings last year in which producers and other stakeholders raised concerns about the old system, including cost, confidentiality, liability and privacy. Some groups also complained that the system benefits only large-scale producers and that the animal ID system is unnecessary because existing animal identification systems are sufficient.

Citing the feedback, Vilsack said "it is apparent that a new strategy for animal disease traceability is needed."

The ability to identify and track livestock became a top priority for USDA following the nation's first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in 2003. The department proposed the system in 2004 and subsequently spent more than $120 million trying to implement it. However, only 36 percent of producers to date have signed up for the program.

While many producers say they recognize the importance of having a system in place to protect animal health and enhance disease control, the USDA plan to tag and track millions of livestock ignited opposition and controversy among ranchers across the nation.

Vilsack said under his new plan, USDA would work with states to create new federal rules and a basic blueprint for the new system. But states would ultimately decide how they want to design their program to meet federal standards.

He said he plans to re-establish an advisory committee with state animal health leaders to assist in evaluating commodity-based animal disease traceability approaches. ...SNIP...END

FULL TEXT ;

http://www.cfbf.com/agalert/AgAlertStory.cfm?ID=1478&ck=83CDCEC08FBF90370FCF53BDD56604FF


SEE what old Ron has to say now, after he let the mad cows out the barn door ;

Some Concerned with USDA's Decision to Scrap NAIS

02/08/2010 from NAFB News Service

Veterinarians and a Bush-era USDA official are expressing reservations about USDA’s decision to dump the National Animal Identification System.

CEO Ron DeHaven says the American Veterinary Medical Association cannot endorse Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack's new approach to animal disease traceability because there are simply too many unanswered questions. “As I understand it they will let each state and tribal nation more or less develop their own program. So I’m concerned about interoperability between fifty or more different systems. Will one state be able to talk to another state as an animal moves through interstate commerce?"

According to DeHaven, who was USDA’s Chief Veterinarian when the first U.S. BSE case was discovered in 2003, politics trumped animal disease control. "In my estimation we’ve allowed those political issues to get in the way of what is a much more important issue, and that is our ability to rapidly trace animals to contain and eliminate a disease outbreak. It’s not a partisan issue, but I think both administrations have been caving to this public resistance, which in my estimation, while it may be important, it pales in comparison to the economic impact of a major disease outbreak."

Bruce Knight, USDA’s Marketing and Regulatory Under Secretary in the final years of the Bush Administration, fears that abandoning the NAIS model will undercut U.S. efforts to obtain a negligible BSE risk rating from the World Organization for Animal Health.

USDA estimates the new animal disease traceability framework will take 18 months to two years to create and implement. But Jay Truitt of Policy Solutions, a Washington-based lobbying firm, says it’ll take a lot longer than that, maybe 4 or 5 years, making it more difficult to lift remaining BSE-related restrictions on U.S. beef exports.

Truitt, formerly Vice President of Government Affairs at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, wasn’t surprised by Vilsack’s decision to scrap NAIS. He described beef cattle producer participation in the program as "pitiful."

http://www.hoosieragtoday.com/wire/news/00222_naisscrap_223049.php


see more of Ron here ;

http://madcowtesting.blogspot.com/2009/02/report-on-testing-ruminants-for-tses-in.html


http://madcowtesting.blogspot.com/


http://madcowtesting.blogspot.com/2008/01/bse-oie-usda.html


Remarks

Bruce I. Knight, Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs FFA Cooperative Agreement Signing Washington, DC

June 4, 2007

SNIP...

We all understand that the goal for NAIS first and foremost is to protect animal health. It's designed to help producers safeguard their flocks and herds, to protect their neighbors and to preserve their profits.

NAIS also builds confidence in the health and wholesomeness of U.S. livestock. Further, the animal ID program enables us to meet the international obligations we face in the world market. Having the system in place will smooth the way for livestock exports.

OIE Designation

As you know, there's been significant concern about BSE around the world. But we're making progress in reassuring our trading partners that we have the safeguards in place to ensure that the products we sell are safe and healthful to eat.

Just two weeks ago, the OIE-the World Organization for Animal Health-awarded the U.S. a formal classification of "controlled risk" for BSE. As Secretary Johanns put it, "That classification confirms what we have always contended-that U.S. regulatory controls are effective and that U.S. fresh beef and beef products from cattle of all ages can be safely traded due to our interlocking safeguards."

The controlled risk classification is essentially an international clean bill of health for our national cattle herd. It's a determination based on a scientific assessment of risk using internationally agreed upon standards.

Any nation that recognizes the OIE standards now has no scientific reason to block imports of U.S. beef-of any age. Eventually, it should put an end to the need for export verification programs.

The key is for our trading partners to adopt the OIE standards as their own standards for safe trade. And we must do the same.

Conclusion

We are moving forward to expand markets and to ensure the health of U.S. herds and flocks with the voluntary NAIS. Today, we welcome FFA as they join with us as partners to encourage farmers and ranchers to take the first step and register their premises.

SEE FULL TEXT ;

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/speeches/content/2007/06/document/FFA-NAIS-SigningFinal%206-4-07.doc


http://www.aphis.usda.gov/traceability/downloads/NAIS-UserGuide.pdf


National Animal Identification System (NAIS)

NAIS: AT A GLANCE

What is (WAS...TSS) NAIS?

Simply put, NAIS is a modern, streamlined information system that helps producers and animal health officials respond quickly and effectively to animal disease events in the United States. The NAIS program—a voluntary State-Federal-Industry partnership—is beneficial because it helps us protect U.S. livestock and poultry from disease spread, maintain consumer confidence in our food supply, and retain access to domestic and foreign markets.

USDA is not requiring participation in the program. NAIS can help producers protect the health and marketability of their animals—but the choice to participate is theirs.

Animal health officials across the country agree that premises registration, the foundation of NAIS, is a necessary first step to achieving these goals. Premises information ensures that producers will be notified quickly when a disease event might impact their area or the species of animals they have. In an animal health emergency, we cannot help producers protect their animals if we do not know they are there. By voluntarily registering their premises and providing contact information, producers will ensure that they receive the information they need—when they need it most—to protect their animals and their investment. In an emergency, animal health officials will be able to quickly locate at-risk animals and take precise actions to address the situation, minimize hardships, and speed disease eradication efforts as much as possible.

The voluntary NAIS also encompasses animal identification and animal movement tracing systems. These components are currently being refined by NAIS’ industry and private sector partners. While the focus today is on premises registration, animal owners should know that the other components of NAIS will be additional options for them when they’re ready to make decisions about what level of participation best suits their needs.

USDA is required by law to protect individuals’ private information. Regardless of the level of participation animal owners choose, the voluntary NAIS is limited in terms of the type and quantity of information maintained by the Federal Government. At the Federal level, the system will hold and maintain only minimal premises information. Beyond the premises registration system, USDA will not “own” any additional data on participants in the system. If USDA needs animal movement and location information to respond to an animal health emergency, data will be requested from the private and State databases where it is held. Federal law protects individuals’ private information and confidential business information from public disclosure.

FULL TEXT 74 PAGES ;

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/traceability/downloads/NAIS-UserGuide.pdf


Tuesday, December 15, 2009

NAIS, COOL, FROM FARM TO FORK, MAD COW DISEASE

http://naiscoolyes.blogspot.com/2009/12/nais-cool-from-farm-to-fork-mad-cow.html


Friday, March 13, 2009

NAIS comments NCBA and R-Calf Wednesday, March 11, 2009 – 10:30 a.m. Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry — Public Hearing

http://usdameatexport.blogspot.com/2009/03/nais-comments-ncba-and-r-calf-wednesday.html


Saturday, August 16, 2008

Qualitative Analysis of BSE Risk Factors in the United States February 13, 2000 at 3:37 pm PST (BSE red book)

http://bseusa.blogspot.com/2008/08/qualitative-analysis-of-bse-risk.html


48 hour traceback for BSE mad cow disease in the USA ???

NOT in your lifetime !

8 YEARS IN REVIEW OF THE MAD COW DEBACLE IN THE USA ;

http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2008/12/mad-cow-disease-usa-december-28-2008-8.html


The most recent assessments (and reassessments) were published in June 2005 (Table I; 18), and included the categorisation of Canada, the USA, and Mexico as GBR III. Although only Canada and the USA have reported cases, the historically open system of trade in North America suggests that it is likely that BSE is present also in Mexico.

http://www.oie.int/boutique/extrait/06heim937950.pdf


February 10, 2010

Greetings,

IN my opinion, i think we need NAIS. i think as a consumer, we have a right to this information. as a Country importing our product, they have a right to know, it should be law. it should be mandatory that when an animal disease or human disease there from break out, the animal and or it's product can be traced. and as a producer of that product, if you are too worried about confidentiality, you are trying to hide something, then you should not be in the business. how in the world can knowing from where a cow comes from i.e. traceability, be such a threat to the producer, unless they simply want to hide something? in 2010, the USA, in relations to cattle identification and tracing, could not trace their @ss if they had both hands on it, in my opinion, and going by past history of the last two documented mad cows. the USA has been discussing this for over a decade. I don't understand it, all these other Country's that have some sort of Animal Traceability in place, they are and have been trying to eradicate BSE, that have had a feed ban in place, that have been abiding by it, testing in numbers to find and eradicate the TSEs, and the USA just seems to be doing the opposite in many ways it seems to me. if the USA is not going to trace it's meat products, why should other Country's trace theirs? The USA is BSE GBR III, all of North America is BSE GBR III (with all the evidence of breaches in the bse feed ban, the breaches in the BSE surveillance program, i personally believe it is BSE GBR IV). The problem is, the USDA just never accepted it (BSE GBR III), and then changed the rules with the BSE MRR. this BSE MRR policy literally trashed 30 years of attempted BSE GBR eradication of this disease. What about other trading partners with the U.S.A. that DO HAVE a traceability system. i think Australia is getting ready to roll over and get MRR'ed, therefore they too will just be another victim of allowing all strains of Typical and Atypical BSE/TSE into their Country via the USDA OIE BSE MRR policy, a policy of trading all strains of mad cow disease globally. The O.I.E., by bending over for the USDA with this damn BSE MRR policy, has sold their sole to the devil, and in doing so, sold yours too. ...

remember, and do not forget what the Honorable Nobel Peace Prize winner of the PRION i.e. Stanley Prusiner said ;

THEY DON'T WANT TO KNOW ! ABSOLUTE IGNORANCE, ALL THAT MATTERS IS TRADE...

AFTER THE COW IN CANADA...LEVEL OF ABSOLUTE IGNORANCE, OF WHAT HE WAS TRYTING TO CONTAIN...

THE ENTIRE POLICY WAS DRIVEN BY WHAT THE USA WAS TELLING HIM TO DO...SO NOW AFTER SOME TIME HAS PASSED...

SO NOW AFTER TIME HAS PASSED IT'S O.K. FOR BONELESS BEEF PRODUCTS FROM UNDER 30 MONTHS TO BE EXPORTED FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES, THAT'S ALL THAT MATTERED...

YES, I THINK THAT PRIONS ARE BAD TO EAT, AND YOU CAN DIE FROM THEM...


http://maddeer.org/video/embedded/prusinerclip.html


Analysis of Data on Presumed Dead and Untraceable Animals

CEAH performed an analysis of the minimum estimated ages of those COI that were classified as either presumed dead or untraceable to determine the likely disposition of those animals based on their ages. Moreover, CEAH performed an analysis of the likely disposition of the one calf that was classified as untraceable during the investigation.


http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/bse/downloads/bse_final_epi_report8-05.pdf



http://usdameatexport.blogspot.com/2009/03/nais-comments-ncba-and-r-calf-wednesday.html


WE know that the FDA mad cow feed ban of August 4, 1997 was nothing but ink on paper. there is still animal protein in commerce in the USA being fed out to cattle and other livestock as we speak. see a few warning letters and or recalls here ;


http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2010/02/import-alert-99-25-detention-without.html


WE also know that the USDA certified dead stock downer cow school lunch program NSLP, fed these most high risk cattle for BSE and mad cow disease and other deadly pathogens to our children all across our Nation for over 4 YEARS, you can see this here ;


http://downercattle.blogspot.com/2009/09/suit-meatpacker-used-downer-cows-for-4.html


Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Establishing a Fully Integrated National Food Safety System with Strengthened Inspection, Laboratory and Response Capacity Draft 09/24/09


http://fdafailedus.blogspot.com/2010/01/establishing-fully-integrated-national.html


Friday, January 29, 2010 14th International Congress on Infectious Diseases H-type and L-type Atypical BSE January 2010 (special pre-congress edition)


http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2010/01/14th-international-congress-on.html


Beef imports from BSE nations not traced

19:16 AEST Mon Feb 8 2010 ago By Simon Jenkins

Beef imported to Australia from countries where there has been an outbreak of mad cow disease will not be traced back to individual farms, a Senate inquiry has been told.

Yet beef farms in Australia are subject to full traceability through the National Livestock Identification System.

The double standard drew the ire of coalition senators during a Senate estimates hearing in Canberra on Monday.

"How on earth ... can we be sure about the beef that's coming from that (overseas) property?" Nationals senator Fiona Nash asked the chief veterinary officer from the government's Biosecurity Service Group.

Asked whether there would be individual assessments of traceability, Dr Andy Carroll replied: "No."

Traceability will be determined on a country-to-country basis, and administered through Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FANZ).

SNIP...END...TSS

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/1009496/beef-imports-from-bse-nations-not-traced


for those interested, please see ;


http://docket-aphis-2006-0041.blogspot.com/2009/05/oie-upgrades-japans-bse-status-to.html


http://docket-aphis-2006-0041.blogspot.com/2009/11/bse-gbr-risk-assessments-update.html


Docket APHIS-2007-0033 Docket Title Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of 2002; Biennial Review and Republication of the Select Agent and Toxin List Docket Type Rulemaking Document APHIS-2007-0033-0001 Document Title Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of 2002; Biennial Review and Republication of the Select Agent and Toxin List Public Submission APHIS-2007-0033-0002.1 Public Submission Title Attachment to Singeltary comment


http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/component/main?main=DocumentDetail&o=090000648027c28e


Manuscript Draft Manuscript Number: Title: HUMAN and ANIMAL TSE Classifications i.e. mad cow disease and the UKBSEnvCJD only theory Article Type: Personal View Corresponding Author: Mr. Terry S. Singeltary, Corresponding Author's Institution: na First Author: Terry S Singeltary, none Order of Authors: Terry S Singeltary, none; Terry S. Singeltary Abstract: TSEs have been rampant in the USA for decades in many species, and they all have been rendered and fed back to animals for human/animal consumption. I propose that the current diagnostic criteria for human TSEs only enhances and helps the spreading of human TSE from the continued belief of the UKBSEnvCJD only theory in 2007.


http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/ContentViewer?objectId=090000648027c28e&disposition=attachment&contentType=pdf


Subject: Importation of Whole Cuts of Boneless Beef from Japan [Docket No. 05-004-1] RIN 0579-AB93 TSS SUBMISSION

Date: August 24, 2005 at 2:47 pm PST

August 24, 2005

Importation of Whole Cuts of Boneless Beef from Japan [Docket No. 05-004-1] RIN 0579-AB93 TSS SUBMISSION

Greetings APHIS ET AL,

My name is Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

I would kindly like to comment on [Docket No. 05-004-1] RIN 0579-AB93 ;

PROPOSED RULES

Exportation and importation of animals and animal products:

Whole cuts of boneless beef from-

Japan,

48494-48500 [05-16422]


http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/ContentViewer?objectId=0900006480086ebc&disposition=attachment&contentType=msw6


Docket No. 03-080-1 -- USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL IMPORTS FROM CANADA


https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/BSEcom.nsf/0/b78ba677e2b0c12185256dd300649f9d?OpenDocument&AutoFramed


PLEASE SEE FULL TEXT HERE ;

Docket No. 03-080-1 -- USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL IMPORTS FROM CANADA


http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2008/07/docket-no-03-080-1-usda-issues-proposed.html


Docket APHIS-2006-0026 Docket Title Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Animal Identification and Importation of Commodities Docket Type Rulemaking Document APHIS-2006-0026-0001 Document Title Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Minimal-Risk Regions, Identification of Ruminants and Processing and Importation of Commodities Public Submission APHIS-2006-0026-0012 Public Submission Title Comment from Terry S Singletary


http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/component/main?main=DocumentDetail&o=09000064801e47e1


Docket APHIS-2006-0041 Docket Title Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Minimal-Risk Regions; Importation of Live Bovines and Products Derived from Bovines Commodities Docket Type Rulemaking Document APHIS-2006-0041-0001 Document Title Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Minimal-Risk Regions; Importation of Live Bovines and Products Derived From Bovines Public Submission APHIS-2006-0041-0028 Public Submission Title Comment from Terry S Singletary

Comment 2006-2007 USA AND OIE POISONING GLOBE WITH BSE MRR POLICY

THE USA is in a most unique situation, one of unknown circumstances with human and animal TSE. THE USA has the most documented TSE in different species to date, with substrains growing in those species (BSE/BASE in cattle and CWD in deer and elk, there is evidence here with different strains), and we know that sheep scrapie has over 20 strains of the typical scrapie with atypical scrapie documented and also BSE is very likely to have passed to sheep. all of which have been rendered and fed back to animals for human and animal consumption, a frightening scenario. WE do not know the outcome, and to play with human life around the globe with the very likely TSE tainted products from the USA, in my opinion is like playing Russian roulette, of long duration, with potential long and enduring consequences, of which once done, cannot be undone. These are the facts as I have come to know through daily and extensive research of TSE over 9 years, since 12/14/97. I do not pretend to have all the answers, but i do know to continue to believe in the ukbsenvcjd only theory of transmission to humans of only this one strain from only this one TSE from only this one part of the globe, will only lead to further failures, and needless exposure to humans from all strains of TSE, and possibly many more needless deaths from TSE via a multitude of proven routes and sources via many studies with primates and rodents and other species.

MY personal belief, since you ask, is that not only the Canadian border, but the USA border, and the Mexican border should be sealed up tighter than a drum for exporting there TSE tainted products, until a validated, 100% sensitive test is available, and all animals for human and animal consumption are tested. all we are doing is the exact same thing the UK did with there mad cow poisoning when they exported it all over the globe, all the while knowing what they were doing. this BSE MRR policy is nothing more than a legal tool to do just exactly what the UK did, thanks to the OIE and GW, it's legal now. and they executed Saddam for poisoning ???

go figure. ...


http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/component/main?main=DocumentDetail&o=09000064801f8151



Docket APHIS-2006-0041 Docket Title Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Minimal-Risk Regions; Importation of Live Bovines and Products Derived from Bovines Commodities Docket Type Rulemaking Document APHIS-2006-0041-0001 Document Title Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Minimal-Risk Regions; Importation of Live Bovines and Products Derived From Bovines Public Submission APHIS-2006-0041-0028.1 Public Submission Title Attachment to Singletary comment

January 28, 2007

Greetings APHIS,

I would kindly like to submit the following to ;

BSE; MRR; IMPORTATION OF LIVE BOVINES AND PRODUCTS DERIVED FROM BOVINES [Docket No. APHIS-2006-0041] RIN 0579-AC01


http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/ContentViewer?objectId=09000064801f8152&disposition=attachment&contentType=msw8



Sent: Friday, December 01, 2006 2:59 PM

Subject: Re: TSE advisory committee for the meeting December 15, 2006 [TSS SUBMISSION

snip...

ONE FINAL COMMENT PLEASE, (i know this is long Dr. Freas but please bear with me)

THE USA is in a most unique situation, one of unknown circumstances with human and animal TSE. THE USA has the most documented TSE in different species to date, with substrains growing in those species (BSE/BASE in cattle and CWD in deer and elk, there is evidence here with different strains), and we know that sheep scrapie has over 20 strains of the typical scrapie with atypical scrapie documented and also BSE is very likely to have passed to sheep. all of which have been rendered and fed back to animals for human and animal consumption, a frightening scenario. WE do not know the outcome, and to play with human life around the globe with the very likely TSE tainted blood from the USA, in my opinion is like playing Russian roulette, of long duration, with potential long and enduring consequences, of which once done, cannot be undone.

These are the facts as i have come to know through daily and extensive research of TSE over 9 years, since 12/14/97. I do not pretend to have all the answers, but i do know to continue to believe in the ukbsenvcjd only theory of transmission to humans of only this one strain from only this one TSE from only this one part of the globe, will only lead to further failures, and needless exposure to humans from all strains of TSE, and possibly many more needless deaths from TSE via a multitude of proven routes and sources via many studies with primates and rodents and other species. ...

Terry S. Singeltary Sr. P.O. Box 42 Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

snip... 48 pages...


http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/ContentViewer?objectId=09000064801f3413&disposition=attachment&contentType=msw8



Sent: Friday, January 29, 2010 3:23 PM

Subject: 14th International Congress on Infectious Diseases H-type and L-type Atypical BSE January 2010 (special pre-congress edition)

18.173 page 189

Experimental Challenge of Cattle with H-type and L-type Atypical BSE

A. Buschmann1, U. Ziegler1, M. Keller1, R. Rogers2, B. Hills3, M.H. Groschup1. 1Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Greifswald-Insel Riems, Germany, 2Health Canada, Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Health Products & Food Branch, Ottawa, Canada, 3Health Canada, Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy Secretariat, Ottawa, Canada

Background: After the detection of two novel BSE forms designated H-type and L-type atypical BSE the question of the pathogenesis and the agent distribution of these two types in cattle was fully open. From initial studies of the brain pathology, it was already known that the anatomical distribution of L-type BSE differs from that of the classical type where the obex region in the brainstem always displays the highest PrPSc concentrations. In contrast in L-type BSE cases, the thalamus and frontal cortex regions showed the highest levels of the pathological prion protein, while the obex region was only weakly involved.

Methods:We performed intracranial inoculations of cattle (five and six per group) using 10%brainstemhomogenates of the two German H- and L-type atypical BSE isolates. The animals were inoculated under narcosis and then kept in a free-ranging stable under appropriate biosafety conditions.At least one animal per group was killed and sectioned in the preclinical stage and the remaining animals were kept until they developed clinical symptoms. The animals were examined for behavioural changes every four weeks throughout the experiment following a protocol that had been established during earlier BSE pathogenesis studies with classical BSE.

Results and Discussion: All animals of both groups developed clinical symptoms and had to be euthanized within 16 months. The clinical picture differed from that of classical BSE, as the earliest signs of illness were loss of body weight and depression. However, the animals later developed hind limb ataxia and hyperesthesia predominantly and the head. Analysis of brain samples from these animals confirmed the BSE infection and the atypical Western blot profile was maintained in all animals. Samples from these animals are now being examined in order to be able to describe the pathogenesis and agent distribution for these novel BSE types. Conclusions: A pilot study using a commercially avaialble BSE rapid test ELISA revealed an essential restriction of PrPSc to the central nervous system for both atypical BSE forms. A much more detailed analysis for PrPSc and infectivity is still ongoing.


http://www.isid.org/14th_icid/


http://ww2.isid.org/Downloads/IMED2009_AbstrAuth.pdf


http://www.isid.org/publications/ICID_Archive.shtml



From: xxxx
To: Terry Singeltary
Sent: Saturday, December 05, 2009 9:09 AM Subject: 14th ICID - abstract accepted for 'International Scientific Exchange'

Your preliminary abstract number: 670

Dear Mr. Singeltary,

On behalf of the Scientific Committee, I am pleased to inform you that your abstract

'Transmissible Spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal and human TSE in North America update October 2009'

WAS accepted for inclusion in the INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC EXCHANGE (ISE) section of the 14th International Congress on Infectious Diseases. Accordingly, your abstract will be included in the "Intl. Scientific Exchange abstract CD-rom" of the Congress which will be distributed to all participants.

Abstracts accepted for INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC EXCHANGE are NOT PRESENTED in the oral OR poster sessions.

Your abstract below was accepted for: INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC EXCHANGE

#0670: Transmissible Spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal and human TSE in North America update October 2009

Author: T. Singeltary; Bacliff, TX/US

Topic: Emerging Infectious Diseases Preferred type of presentation: International Scientific Exchange

This abstract has been ACCEPTED.

#0670: Transmissible Spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal and human TSE in North America update October 2009

Authors: T. Singeltary; Bacliff, TX/US

Title: Transmissible Spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal and human TSE in North America update October 2009

Body: Background

An update on atypical BSE and other TSE in North America. Please remember, the typical U.K. c-BSE, the atypical l-BSE (BASE), and h-BSE have all been documented in North America, along with the typical scrapie's, and atypical Nor-98 Scrapie, and to date, 2 different strains of CWD, and also TME. All these TSE in different species have been rendered and fed to food producing animals for humans and animals in North America (TSE in cats and dogs ?), and that the trading of these TSEs via animals and products via the USA and Canada has been immense over the years, decades.

Methods

12 years independent research of available data

Results

I propose that the current diagnostic criteria for human TSEs only enhances and helps the spreading of human TSE from the continued belief of the UKBSEnvCJD only theory in 2009. With all the science to date refuting it, to continue to validate this old myth, will only spread this TSE agent through a multitude of potential routes and sources i.e. consumption, medical i.e., surgical, blood, dental, endoscopy, optical, nutritional supplements, cosmetics etc.

Conclusion

I would like to submit a review of past CJD surveillance in the USA, and the urgent need to make all human TSE in the USA a reportable disease, in every state, of every age group, and to make this mandatory immediately without further delay. The ramifications of not doing so will only allow this agent to spread further in the medical, dental, surgical arena's. Restricting the reporting of CJD and or any human TSE is NOT scientific. Iatrogenic CJD knows NO age group, TSE knows no boundaries.

I propose as with Aguzzi, Asante, Collinge, Caughey, Deslys, Dormont, Gibbs, Gajdusek, Ironside, Manuelidis, Marsh, et al and many more, that the world of TSE Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy is far from an exact science, but there is enough proven science to date that this myth should be put to rest once and for all, and that we move forward with a new classification for human and animal TSE that would properly identify the infected species, the source species, and then the route.

Keywords: Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease Prion


http://www.isid.org/14th_icid/


http://www.isid.org/publications/ICID_Archive.shtml


http://ww2.isid.org/Downloads/IMED2009_AbstrAuth.pdf


Monday, October 19, 2009

Atypical BSE, BSE, and other human and animal TSE in North America Update October 19, 2009

snip...

I ask Professor Kong ;

Thursday, December 04, 2008 3:37 PM Subject: RE: re--Chronic Wating Disease (CWD) and Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathies (BSE): Public Health Risk Assessment

''IS the h-BSE more virulent than typical BSE as well, or the same as cBSE, or less virulent than cBSE? just curious.....''

Professor Kong reply ;

.....snip

''As to the H-BSE, we do not have sufficient data to say one way or another, but we have found that H-BSE can infect humans. I hope we could publish these data once the study is complete.

Thanks for your interest.''

Best regards,

Qingzhong Kong, PhD Associate Professor Department of Pathology Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH 44106 USA

END...TSS

I look forward to further transmission studies, and a true ENHANCED BSE/atypical BSE surveillance program put forth testing all cattle for human and animal consumption for 5 years. a surveillance program that uses the most sensitive TSE testing, and has the personnel that knows how to use them, and can be trusted. I look forward to a stringent mad cow feed ban being put forth, and then strictly enforced. we need a forced, not voluntary feed ban, an enhanced feed ban at that, especially excluding blood. we need some sort of animal traceability. no more excuses about privacy. if somebody is putting out a product that is killing folks and or has the potential to kill you, then everybody needs to know who they are, and where that product came from. same with hospitals, i think medical incidents in all states should be recorded, and made public, when it comes to something like a potential accidental transmission exposure event. so if someone is out there looking at a place to go have surgery done, if you have several hospitals having these type 'accidental exposure events', than you can go some place else. it only makes sense. somewhere along the road, the consumer lost control, and just had to take whatever they were given, and then charged these astronomical prices. some where along the line the consumer just lost interest, especially on a long incubating disease such as mad cow disease i.e. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy. like i said before, there is much more to the mad cow story than bovines and eating a hamburger, we must start focusing on all TSE in all species. ...TSS


http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2009/10/atypical-bse-bse-and-other-human-and.html


snip...full text ;


Friday, January 29, 2010

14th International Congress on Infectious Diseases H-type and L-type Atypical BSE January 2010 (special pre-congress edition)


http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2010/01/14th-international-congress-on.html


Sunday, January 17, 2010

BSE USA feed inspection violations 01/01/2009 to 01/17/2010 FDA BSE/Ruminant Feed Inspections Firms Inventory Report

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2010/01/bse-usa-feed-inspection-violations.html


Tuesday, January 19, 2010

CVM's OR Develops New PCR-Based Method for Testing Animal Feed

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2010/01/cvms-or-develops-new-pcr-based-method.html


Saturday, January 2, 2010

Human Prion Diseases in the United States January 1, 2010 ***FINAL***

http://prionunitusaupdate2008.blogspot.com/2010/01/human-prion-diseases-in-united-states.html


my comments to PLosone here ;


http://www.plosone.org/annotation/listThread.action?inReplyTo=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fannotation%2F04ce2b24-613d-46e6-9802-4131e2bfa6fd&root=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fannotation%2F04ce2b24-613d-46e6-9802-4131e2bfa6fd



Thursday, February 4, 2010

SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Draft Minutes of the 103rd Meeting held on 24th November 2009


http://seac992007.blogspot.com/2010/02/spongiform-encephalopathy-advisory.html


Wednesday, February 10, 2010

The Honorable Ms. Kim Min-sun Anti-US Beef Actress Prevails in Court


http://usdavskorea.blogspot.com/2010/02/honorable-ms-kim-min-sun-anti-us-beef.html


Wednesday, November 18, 2009

R-CALF: 40 Groups Disagree With USDA's Latest BSE Court Submission


http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2009/11/r-calf-40-groups-disagree-with-usdas.html



Monday, October 19, 2009

Atypical BSE, BSE, and other human and animal TSE in North America Update October 19, 2009


http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2009/10/atypical-bse-bse-and-other-human-and.html



Sunday, September 6, 2009

MAD COW USA 1997 SECRET VIDEO


http://madcowusda.blogspot.com/2009/09/mad-cow-usa-1997-video.html



U.S.A. HIDING MAD COW DISEASE VICTIMS AS SPORADIC CJD ? see video at bottom


http://creutzfeldt-jakob-disease.blogspot.com/2009/07/usa-hiding-mad-cow-disease-victims-as.html



DAMNING TESTIMONY FROM STANLEY PRUSINER THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE WINNER ON PRIONS SPEAKING ABOUT ANN VENEMAN see video


http://maddeer.org/video/embedded/prusinerclip.html



Thursday, January 07, 2010

Scrapie and Nor-98 Scrapie November 2009 Monthly Report Fiscal Year 2010 and FISCAL YEAR 2008


http://scrapie-usa.blogspot.com/2010/01/scrapie-and-nor-98-scrapie-november.html



Monday, December 14, 2009

Similarities between Forms of Sheep Scrapie and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Are Encoded by Distinct Prion Types


http://nor-98.blogspot.com/2009/12/similarities-between-forms-of-sheep.html



Friday, February 05, 2010

New Variant Creutzfelt Jakob Disease case reports United States 2010 A Review


http://vcjd.blogspot.com/2010/02/new-variant-creutzfelt-jakob-disease.html



Terry S. Singeltary Sr. P.O. Box 42 Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

No comments:

Post a Comment